43 thoughts on “North Pole – Did You Know…

  1. The US Air Force has a doctrine to ‘own the weather’ by the year 2020. Instead of chemtrails (conspiracy theories) look up geo-engineering. There is far more going on than National Geographic hands to the public …

    Liked by 2 people

    • Yeah, same here! Had a conversation with a blogger only recently, who sent me links to articles about global warming not being real. I have to say, that there were some interesting points in those but I still don’t buy it. Global warming is happening.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, and it was almost 80 degrees here today. That’s an anomaly in our region. Merry Christmas all the same (it’s still Christmas for another hour here)!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I dont think people understand and the article does not address the methane from the thawing permafrost will not be sequestered in this semi-scientific article. Nor can we scrub enough CO2 form the air by artificial means when all the world’s microbes and vegetation cannot with 24/7 processing 365 days a year and no need for outside energy consumption to do it. This is another denial of the need to change out fuel sources regardless of the economic costs and very very soon.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Global warming is real, no doubt. The debate should center on whether it is caused by human activity or is a natural cyclical occurrence, always mindful that there is no financial profit to be made if natural.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. These are the kinds of things that drive me nuts. We cannot count on having technology in the future to get it back to how it was before. People have been so reluctant to reverse climate change these days that I find it hard to believe they will be any easier to convince after the fact. Besides, when there’s a flu floating around the community, to you wait to get sick and then load yourself with Tylenol and whatnot, or do you take preventative measures so you don’t get sick in the first place? Our world is sick and the melting North Pole is a symptom. We must work toward preventative measures *now*, not take our chances and wait for it to happen before we do something about it. Besides, when we say we “might” have technology then to fix it, the operative word is “might.” I do not find that comforting. It won’t stop with the North Pole, either. The Antarctic ice sheet is melting. Sea levels are rising. Carbon dioxide levels are increasing. This is only the beginning of a long chain of events that will only get harder to reverse as time goes on. I say we act now, change policies, talk to our politicians and work toward change, while we still can.

    Liked by 1 person

      • As near as I can gather, some people just don’t sense the immediacy of this problem. They don’t see how it will impact them, and even if they do, perhaps they’re in denial. As painful as it is to watch denialism, I find it’s important to learn to understand both sides of the story—both activism and denialism. Once you know all the arguments, you can easily defend your point using rhetoric that appeals to whatever perspective you’re arguing against. For instance, if I’m an activist and I want to convince a denialist living on a receding shoreline that they should help us act against climate change, I wouldn’t scare them with talk about sea levels rising—I’d explain that although their wealth is about to sink below the ocean, there are plenty of other options they can exercise *before* their wealth sinks below the ocean. It also helps to avoid dramatic phrases and stick to the facts. You’d be surprised how well simple factual arguments work in the place of hyperboles. Hyperboles inspire emotion, but in this case, it’s often fear. And fear is both useless and unnecessary.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks. I’m not usually this eloquent about global warming. Usually, I just stomp around pummeling the walls with my fists so I don’t punch someone. (I’m exaggerating, of course, but not by much.) So I’m glad I’m succeeding at diplomacy this time around. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  5. A very timely, and extremely interesting article. One of special interest to myself as a Canadian since at least in some ways we might be seen as the unintended caretakers of a large portion of the geographical area in question here. In Canada (as well as other concerned countries) we get somewhat of a preview of the type of questions that will need to be answered in the future every year as Import/Export companies and Shipping interests wait to see when Hudson Bay will open for business (the Port of Churchill in northern Manitoba has on average only a 14-week operational period). A year-round navigable Arctic would certainly bring with it economic benefits that would be hard to argue with.

    Liked by 1 person

      • Certainly nothing too good for our furry friend the polar bear who right about now is making it’s annual migration right through the tow of Churchill that I mentioned earlier. I hope everybody stays safe this year.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Though I don’t particularly like the idea of prizing economics before wildlife, I have to admit it’s a relief to hear someone argue that global warming is indeed happening. Even if the argument seems to support global warming as a beneficial occurrence.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Oh, please don’t misunderstand me, my own views on the global warming debate are irrelevant here, since I truly meant to sympathize with those who support the view when they find themselves coming up against the money-hungry corporations. Arguing with the average global-warming denier is one thing, squaring off against these huge corporations is a whole different matter. These are the same corporations that could basically rule a fair portion of this world if this TPP manages to get approved, and whatever my own personal views are regarding Global Warming or anything else, I would gladly join forces with ANYONE in the battle to see that trade agreement squashed before there is no climate left to argue about.

        Liked by 2 people

      • You have no idea how refreshing it is to hear that. Of course, there will be climate left (only a drastically changed one), but I get where you’re coming from. And it really had never occurred to me that once people stop denying global warning, they might try to use it to their benefit (like those corporations o which you speak). I’m not sure what would be worse: pretending it’s not real, or arguing that it’s beneficial.

        I spend entirely too much time reading about frustrating denialism and laziness in pushing for change. I honestly can’t stress enough how nice it is to hear someone admit global warming is a real danger.

        Liked by 2 people

  6. Technology isn’t a solution! It is a by-product of our life and lifestyle and ideally I would want our lifestyle to effect a positive change in climate. A far-fetched expectation as sustainable development still appears to be a dream in many countries. I am not sure if I want to mess around with nature even more than we already have

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Depends on the “shape” of the rest of the planet and the potential feasibility of expanding our world’s life/existence to other planets. I am constantly amazed at how the forces that act on the earth have a mirror or similarity to what scientists have learned and applied to “extraterrestrial” forces on other planets, in our solar system, and in the universe at large. These scientific discoveries and (potential) advances are coming at such a fast pace that, in the best case, we may be able to save humanity from itself!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s