Grizzly Bear – Did You Know…

… That the Grizzly Bear is a subspecies of the Brown Bear and can get up to 8 feet (2.5m) tall (standing up). With 800 pounds (360kilograms) they for sure are no light-weights either.

Grizzly bears are specially adapted to survive the changing seasons. During warmer months, they eat a massive amount of food so they can live off body fat during the winter, when food is scarce. They may intake 90 pounds (40 kg) of food each day, gaining over 2.2 pounds (1 kg) of body weight a day. As omnivores, grizzlies will eat anything nutritious they can find, gorging on nuts, fruit, leaves, roots, fungi, insects, and a variety of animals including salmon and other fish, rodents, sheep, and elk. Their diet varies depending on what foods are available for the season.

The bears settle in their dens (which they start digging when during fall) to hibernate for the winter. This deep sleep allows the grizzlies to conserve energy. Their heart rate slows down from 40 beats per minute to 8, and they do not go to the bathroom at all during these months of slumber.

Now here’s a very interesting fact: Pregnant grizzly bears even give birth in their sleep! Midwinter, grizzly bear cubs (usually born in pairs) arrive into the world blind, hairless, and toothless. They use what little strength they have to nestle into their mother and nurse. For a month, the cubs feed on their mother’s milk and gain strength. By the time spring comes, the cubs have opened their eyes and grown teeth and fur; the new family is ready to venture outside the den.

Now just imagine! I guess a Grizzly does not get sleep debriefed…

The cubs stay under their mother’s care for 2-3 years. While mother grizzlies are fiercely protective of their cubs (so don’t even think about playing with the cuddly baby teddies…), nearly half the cubs do not survive past the first year, falling to disease, starvation, and predators like wolves, mountain lions, and adult male grizzlies.

Grizzly bears have a multitude of strengths. They are highly intelligent and have excellent memories. Detecting food from great distances away, grizzlies have an astute sense of smell, even better than that of a hound dog. They are good swimmers and fast runners, reaching speeds as high as 35 mph (50 km/h) over land. So don’t try to outrun them…
Young grizzlies also have the ability to climb trees to evade danger, but this skill fades as they become bigger.

 

 

 

17 thoughts on “Grizzly Bear – Did You Know…

  1. I did know all of that…. ^_^ Someone once told me that my totem animal was the bear, so I looked it all up. Plus, when one lives in the Pacific Northwest, it’s good to know what the predators are. ^_^ Mostly brown bears here, but I here they’re trying to get the grizzlies to come back.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. These are always so interesting. There is a place in Michigan that takes in rescue bears. Visitors can come and walk through the park (from a distance) and see the different bears. They have a Grizzly, boy is it taaallllll when it stands on it’s back legs.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I love studying animals, so when I saw this blog -I had to read. You did miss a couple of details -The adult bear -can still climb, and what they don’t climb they will knock down -so you don’t want to climb a tree either. Best to lay down on your belly and cover your head with your arms -if you are being chased.

    If they are not moving stand tall and lift your arms over your head to make you feel taller -but don’t move.
    http://www.fiddledeedeebooks.wordpress.com

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Pingback: Sleeping During Giving Birth? | A Momma's View

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